Monday, December 29, 2014

Jolley, Runkle and Grandin are really up to what?

As we charge into 2015, there will be nothing more important than stopping the self-destruction from within. The fox is in the hen house and that has never been an more appropriate analogy.

In this post I plan to shA)are with you the facts and you can make your own decisions as to what is really going on.

First off, multiple agricultural media outlets have posted an article by Chuck Jolley that suggests that the actions of a couple of animal rights activists will actually improve the future of milk, meat and egg production.


In December 2014 Jolley penned a written piece calling Mercy for Animals (MfA) part of the "solution" to animal abuse. He makes a great case for Mercy for Animals not being like other animals rights groups yet all industry experts agree that Nathan Runkle is just another vegan animal rights zealot that stops at nothing short of ending animal agriculture.

As much as I would like to link to the piece he wrote with a positive light on Nathan Runkle and Mercy for Animals, Drovers has removed the link to the website for obvious reasons of integrity.




This photo from the "Free to Be" a Hollywood Gala of Runkle with extreme vegan activist Sam Simon says it all. The event is sponsored by vegan groups and Runkle is not interested in better treatment for animals but simply wants the farming of  animals to cease. 

Within one week of the Jolley article appearing in Drovers publications, Runkle made statements such as:

"Sexual abuse of cows in Factory Farms is not uncommon" he said in a Huffington Post interview along side Matthew Dominguez from HSUS.

"The success of the NYC Vegetarian Food Festival and the dozens of similar events sprouting up all over the nation, is a true testament to the growing interest and excitement surrounding plant based eating. MfA's outreach at such events is aimed at informing and inspiring attendees to explore veganism and for those who are already vegan to put their compassion into action by becoming involved in animal advocacy protection efforts."  as told to One Green Planet.

Jolley gives credit to vegan zealot Runkle for outing bad apples in food animal production when in fact the "undercover" videos have been staged and produced like the Hollywood productions and actors MfA panders to for money.

Runkle's work is actually best described by true animal scientist Dr, Janeen Salak-Johnson from the University of Illinois.

"I am still waiting for someone to tell me what MFA undercover videos have actually done for animal welfare. It's not about concern for animal welfare it's about their vegetarian/vegan agenda and putting those in animal agriculture out of business."

Additionally Chuck Jolley relentlessly promotes Dr. Temple Grandin as part of the solution to improved animal welfare. I must ask what her credentials are?


How many peer-reviewed scientific pieces of research has Dr. Grandin published on animal welfare? 

ZERO! She has yet to publish a single article on dairy welfare, pig welfare, chicken welfare or cattle welfare.

The only bit of science you will find Dr. Grandin involved in with food animals is the behavior of cattle based on the placement of the swirl on their head.

For most who may be skeptics on Dr. Grandin's true credibility on animal welfare, I put together a short list of statements she has made about animal welfare.

If you take the time to read them all, you soon find out that she bases her "research" on the polls she takes of uninformed consumers not true scientists. Her suggested mode of food production has been adapted by the EU and has proven to be a flaming disaster for domestically produced food.

Temple Says:

“I was raised in the East,” she adds. ”I go back and forth between both worlds. It gives me a different perspective. Ten years ago, at a Christmas dinner, my sister bought up the subject of sow gestation stalls. There was no way I was going to sell her on it. I can’t sell it to the public. Two-thirds of the public has a problem with a sow not being able to turn around. So gestation stalls have got to go. They will be phased out slowly. Survey show acceptance of raising pigs inside on slatted floors. It does require more building space.”

“We’ve gotten better with humane handling, but now we’re getting animals that are harder to handle,” she says. “Some pigs are mean. We’ve bred pigs for leanness, but unfortunately it also has selected for aggression. Some of our lean girls are mean girls who like to fight. That has to be changed. I see lameness in cattle from product use, and bigger animals that are heat-stressed. When you breed animals to grow, grow, grow, they may lose disease resistance. Nature has trade-offs. We have to look at what’s optimal. But profit incentive gets in the way.”
Speaking to Iowa Farm Bureau 2012

“It’s a big No. 1,” she said. “Lameness is at the top of my list.”

Some dairies do a good job of keeping lameness under control, she added. “But there are other places where the lameness is absolutely horrible.”
Dairy Herd Management  June 2011

“We’ve got work to do in the dairy industry, and we have areas of management which need to be improved.”” Her challenge to the industry is to re-evaluate our procedures in dairy herd husbandry and to implement programs enabling dairy to represent the beef market with the same goals for quality as we pursue the milk market.
To a group of Humane Agents in PA 2012

She said the dairy industry has widespread problems with cows that are lame or too thin. "Many farmers have gotten accustomed to keeping livestock in poor condition and are refusing to improve practices", she said.

"The bad has become normal," Grandin said in remarks at an organic food industry conference.
She also is concerned, she said, about egg producers' continued use of battery cages to house hens. "The cages are not large enough to allow the hens room to express their normal behaviors of perching, nesting and scratching," according to Grandin.

"Conditions are especially bad on farms that primarily sell their eggs in a liquid or powder form rather than in the shell", she said in an interview.

"Those farms do not get audited by the companies that buy the product, and cage sizes are so small that the hens have to sleep on top of each other", Grandin claims.

While visiting dairy farm she says

“That’s one sad, unhappy, upset cow. She wants her baby…It’s like grieving, mourning—not much written about it. People don’t like to allow them thoughts or feelings.”

Dr. Temple Grandin, Author, Animal Scientist, Agricultural Consultant: “I think some of this is, you know, big customers demanding it and the other thing I think is every phone is a video camera now with an instant Internet hookup and I think that's another factor.  Because I've had a saying I've had for a long time, heat softens steel.  And then reformers like me can bend it in to pretty grill work.  And the thing is I want to bend it in to pretty grill work, not just have a mess.  We've got to do practical things that are going to work.”

ABC News\

"Dehorning hurts," said Grandin. "It's a lot of stress and we should be giving them a lot of anesthetics. The research is clear. The dehorning is the single most painful thing we do."
Jan 2010

After actually touring Fair Oaks Dairy

“I was very impressed with the dairy,” she told HAT. It was beautiful! Let’s look at the things I’ll score on animal welfare. Body condition, excellent. They’re getting 3 ½ lactations per cow. Lameness, I watched some of them going up to the milking parlor and I didn’t see any lame cows. Conditions of hots and legs was absolutely beautiful. I didn’t see swellings, and clean. They were nice and clean. Those are really important things for animal welfare in a dairy. And I watched the cattle go into the circular parlor and they were just going in all by themselves nice and quiet. That’s the way it’s supposed to work.”

There’s a close analogy to that radicalism—abstractification abstractifying itself even further—in the business of breeding animals for industrialized agriculture. Grandin has inspected hundreds of packing plants and feedlots and seen hundreds of thousands—if not millions—of hogs. She tells me about a problem that crept up on breeders trying to create extra lean pigs. She would walk through a yard, “shaking gates,” as she puts it. “I noticed that these pigs were absolutely hyper. They slowly got more excitable. If the only pigs you see are those pigs, then you don’t realize how bad they’re getting. I call that bad becoming normal.” The same thing has happened in chicken breeding. 

In her book Animals in Translation, Grandin quotes the Aboriginal saying “Dogs make us human.” This is a simple evolutionary truth. “People wouldn’t have become who we are today,” she notes, “if we hadn’t co-evolved with dogs.” But humans need more than a shared history with animals. We need a co-evolving present as well. We need their eyes upon us, asking us, if only implicitly, who we are.
Discover Magazine 2005

"For me, the ideal family dairy farm would be smaller and local with 75-200 of free grazing cattle and enough clean, well maintained robotic milkers. Farmers wouldn’t have to be around 6am and 6pm every day for the drudgery of milking. But, neither will the cow. She will be free to graze and come in to milk when she wants to or needs to."
Lely Robotic Milking marketing website.

A professor of animal science at Colorado State University, she has authored or coauthored more than 30 books and has also spoken widely about how her own autism gives her insights into how animals think and feel.

"In dairy cows, reproduction rates have fallen over the years as milk production rates have risen. People think they can override genetics and breed a cow that makes lots of milk, has lots of calves, and has an immune system that can fight off disease. But it takes energy to make milk, make calves, and maintain that immune system. You can’t feed a cow enough to support all of those functions. Nature has a system: When an animal gets too thin and there’s not enough feed, reproduction shuts down. If the animal does conceive, her body funnels nutrition into the fetus. It takes two years to grow a dairy cow, and they’re only lasting through two lactations."

"Biological overload also overruns animals’ immune systems. As one example, there was a huge diarrheal epidemic in pigs last year. I’m worried that we’ll push too hard and cause a big disease outbreak. We need animals to be hardy, and you have to give up a little bit of productivity to get hardiness."
Food for 2050 Forum


It's time for food producers to decide who, among Jolley, Runkle and Grandin, is for us and who is actually working against us!

Trent Loos
515 418-8185


Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Here is the list of approved chemicals applied to organic food production according to USDA

The National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances

§205.600   Evaluation criteria for allowed and prohibited substances, methods, and ingredients.

The following criteria will be utilized in the evaluation of substances or ingredients for the organic production and handling sections of the National List:

(a) Synthetic and nonsynthetic substances considered for inclusion on or deletion from the National List of allowed and prohibited substances will be evaluated using the criteria specified in the Act (7 U.S.C. 6517 and 6518).

(b) In addition to the criteria set forth in the Act, any synthetic substance used as a processing aid or adjuvant will be evaluated against the following criteria:

(1) The substance cannot be produced from a natural source and there are no organic substitutes;

(2) The substance's manufacture, use, and disposal do not have adverse effects on the environment and are done in a manner compatible with organic handling;

(3) The nutritional quality of the food is maintained when the substance is used, and the substance, itself, or its breakdown products do not have an adverse effect on human health as defined by applicable Federal regulations;

(4) The substance's primary use is not as a preservative or to recreate or improve flavors, colors, textures, or nutritive value lost during processing, except where the replacement of nutrients is required by law;

(5) The substance is listed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) when used in accordance with FDA's good manufacturing practices (GMP) and contains no residues of heavy metals or other contaminants in excess of tolerances set by FDA; and

(6) The substance is essential for the handling of organically produced agricultural products.

(c) Nonsynthetics used in organic processing will be evaluated using the criteria specified in the Act (7 U.S.C. 6517 and 6518).

§205.601   Synthetic substances allowed for use in organic crop production.

In accordance with restrictions specified in this section, the following synthetic substances may be used in organic crop production: Provided, That, use of such substances do not contribute to contamination of crops, soil, or water. Substances allowed by this section, except disinfectants and sanitizers in paragraph (a) and those substances in paragraphs (c), (j), (k), and (l) of this section, may only be used when the provisions set forth in §205.206(a) through (d) prove insufficient to prevent or control the target pest.

(a) As algicide, disinfectants, and sanitizer, including irrigation system cleaning systems.

(1) Alcohols.

(i) Ethanol.

(ii) Isopropanol.

(2) Chlorine materials—For pre-harvest use, residual chlorine levels in the water in direct crop contact or as water from cleaning irrigation systems applied to soil must not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act, except that chlorine products may be used in edible sprout production according to EPA label directions.

(i) Calcium hypochlorite.

(ii) Chlorine dioxide.

(iii) Sodium hypochlorite.

(3) Copper sulfate—for use as an algicide in aquatic rice systems, is limited to one application per field during any 24-month period. Application rates are limited to those which do not increase baseline soil test values for copper over a timeframe agreed upon by the producer and accredited certifying agent.

(4) Hydrogen peroxide.

(5) Ozone gas—for use as an irrigation system cleaner only.

(6) Peracetic acid—for use in disinfecting equipment, seed, and asexually propagated planting material. Also permitted in hydrogen peroxide formulations as allowed in §205.601(a) at concentration of no more than 6% as indicated on the pesticide product label.

(7) Soap-based algicide/demossers.

(8) Sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate (CAS #-15630-89-4)—Federal law restricts the use of this substance in food crop production to approved food uses identified on the product label.

(b) As herbicides, weed barriers, as applicable.

(1) Herbicides, soap-based—for use in farmstead maintenance (roadways, ditches, right of ways, building perimeters) and ornamental crops.

(2) Mulches.

(i) Newspaper or other recycled paper, without glossy or colored inks.

(ii) Plastic mulch and covers (petroleum-based other than polyvinyl chloride (PVC)).

(iii) Biodegradable biobased mulch film as defined in §205.2. Must be produced without organisms or feedstock derived from excluded methods.

(c) As compost feedstocks—Newspapers or other recycled paper, without glossy or colored inks.

(d) As animal repellents—Soaps, ammonium—for use as a large animal repellant only, no contact with soil or edible portion of crop.

(e) As insecticides (including acaricides or mite control).

(1) Ammonium carbonate—for use as bait in insect traps only, no direct contact with crop or soil.

(2) Aqueous potassium silicate (CAS #-1312-76-1)—the silica, used in the manufacture of potassium silicate, must be sourced from naturally occurring sand.

(3) Boric acid—structural pest control, no direct contact with organic food or crops.

(4) Copper sulfate—for use as tadpole shrimp control in aquatic rice production, is limited to one application per field during any 24-month period. Application rates are limited to levels which do not increase baseline soil test values for copper over a timeframe agreed upon by the producer and accredited certifying agent.

(5) Elemental sulfur.

(6) Lime sulfur—including calcium polysulfide.

(7) Oils, horticultural—narrow range oils as dormant, suffocating, and summer oils.

(8) Soaps, insecticidal.

(9) Sticky traps/barriers.

(10) Sucrose octanoate esters (CAS #s—42922-74-7; 58064-47-4)—in accordance with approved labeling.

(f) As insect management. Pheromones.

(g) As rodenticides. Vitamin D3.

(h) As slug or snail bait. Ferric phosphate (CAS # 10045-86-0).

(i) As plant disease control.

(1) Aqueous potassium silicate (CAS #-1312-76-1)—the silica, used in the manufacture of potassium silicate, must be sourced from naturally occurring sand.

(2) Coppers, fixed—copper hydroxide, copper oxide, copper oxychloride, includes products exempted from EPA tolerance, Provided, That, copper-based materials must be used in a manner that minimizes accumulation in the soil and shall not be used as herbicides.

(3) Copper sulfate—Substance must be used in a manner that minimizes accumulation of copper in the soil.

(4) Hydrated lime.

(5) Hydrogen peroxide.

(6) Lime sulfur.

(7) Oils, horticultural, narrow range oils as dormant, suffocating, and summer oils.

(8) Peracetic acid—for use to control fire blight bacteria. Also permitted in hydrogen peroxide formulations as allowed in §205.601(i) at concentration of no more than 6% as indicated on the pesticide product label.

(9) Potassium bicarbonate.

(10) Elemental sulfur.

(11) Streptomycin, for fire blight control in apples and pears only until October 21, 2014.

(12) Tetracycline, for fire blight control in apples and pears only until October 21, 2014.

(j) As plant or soil amendments.

(1) Aquatic plant extracts (other than hydrolyzed)—Extraction process is limited to the use of potassium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide; solvent amount used is limited to that amount necessary for extraction.

(2) Elemental sulfur.

(3) Humic acids—naturally occurring deposits, water and alkali extracts only.

(4) Lignin sulfonate—chelating agent, dust suppressant.

(5) Magnesium sulfate—allowed with a documented soil deficiency.

(6) Micronutrients—not to be used as a defoliant, herbicide, or desiccant. Those made from nitrates or chlorides are not allowed. Soil deficiency must be documented by testing.

(i) Soluble boron products.

(ii) Sulfates, carbonates, oxides, or silicates of zinc, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and cobalt.

(7) Liquid fish products—can be pH adjusted with sulfuric, citric or phosphoric acid. The amount of acid used shall not exceed the minimum needed to lower the pH to 3.5.

(8) Vitamins, B1, C, and E.

(9) Sulfurous acid (CAS # 7782-99-2) for on-farm generation of substance utilizing 99% purity elemental sulfur per paragraph (j)(2) of this section.

(k) As plant growth regulators. Ethylene gas—for regulation of pineapple flowering.

(l) As floating agents in postharvest handling.

(1) Lignin sulfonate.

(2) Sodium silicate—for tree fruit and fiber processing.

(m) As synthetic inert ingredients as classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for use with nonsynthetic substances or synthetic substances listed in this section and used as an active pesticide ingredient in accordance with any limitations on the use of such substances.

(1) EPA List 4—Inerts of Minimal Concern.

(2) EPA List 3—Inerts of unknown toxicity—for use only in passive pheromone dispensers.

(n) Seed preparations. Hydrogen chloride (CAS # 7647-01-0)—for delinting cotton seed for planting.

(o) As production aids. Microcrystalline cheesewax (CAS #'s 64742-42-3, 8009-03-08, and 8002-74-2)-for use in log grown mushroom production. Must be made without either ethylene-propylene co-polymer or synthetic colors.

(p)-(z) [Reserved]

[65 FR 80637, Dec. 21, 2000, as amended at 68 FR 61992, Oct. 31, 2003; 71 FR 53302 Sept. 11, 2006; 72 FR 69572, Dec. 10, 2007; 75 FR 38696, July 6, 2010; 75 FR 77524, Dec. 13, 2010; 77 FR 8092, Feb. 14, 2012; 77 FR 33298, June 6, 2012; 77 FR 45907, Aug. 2, 2012; 78 FR 31821, May 28, 2013; 79 FR 58663, Sept. 30, 2014]

§205.602   Nonsynthetic substances prohibited for use in organic crop production.

The following nonsynthetic substances may not be used in organic crop production:

(a) Ash from manure burning.

(b) Arsenic.

(c) Calcium chloride, brine process is natural and prohibited for use except as a foliar spray to treat a physiological disorder associated with calcium uptake.

(d) Lead salts.

(e) Potassium chloride—unless derived from a mined source and applied in a manner that minimizes chloride accumulation in the soil.

(f) Sodium fluoaluminate (mined).

(g) Sodium nitrate—unless use is restricted to no more than 20% of the crop's total nitrogen requirement; use in spirulina production is unrestricted until October 21, 2005.

(h) Strychnine.

(i) Tobacco dust (nicotine sulfate).

(j)-(z) [Reserved]

[68 FR 61992, Oct. 31, 2003]

§205.603   Synthetic substances allowed for use in organic livestock production.

In accordance with restrictions specified in this section the following synthetic substances may be used in organic livestock production:

(a) As disinfectants, sanitizer, and medical treatments as applicable.

(1) Alcohols.

(i) Ethanol-disinfectant and sanitizer only, prohibited as a feed additive.

(ii) Isopropanol-disinfectant only.

(2) Aspirin-approved for health care use to reduce inflammation.

(3) Atropine (CAS #-51-55-8)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian; and

(ii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 56 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 12 days after administering to dairy animals.

(4) Biologics—Vaccines.

(5) Butorphanol (CAS #-42408-82-2)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian; and

(ii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 42 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 8 days after administering to dairy animals.

(6) Chlorhexidine—Allowed for surgical procedures conducted by a veterinarian. Allowed for use as a teat dip when alternative germicidal agents and/or physical barriers have lost their effectiveness.

(7) Chlorine materials—disinfecting and sanitizing facilities and equipment. Residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

(i) Calcium hypochlorite.

(ii) Chlorine dioxide.

(iii) Sodium hypochlorite.

(8) Electrolytes—without antibiotics.

(9) Flunixin (CAS #-38677-85-9)—in accordance with approved labeling; except that for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires a withdrawal period of at least two-times that required by the FDA.

(10) Furosemide (CAS #-54-31-9)—in accordance with approved labeling; except that for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires a withdrawal period of at least two-times that required that required by the FDA.

(11) Glucose.

(12) Glycerine—Allowed as a livestock teat dip, must be produced through the hydrolysis of fats or oils.

(13) Hydrogen peroxide.

(14) Iodine.

(15) Magnesium hydroxide (CAS #-1309-42-8)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian.

(16) Magnesium sulfate.

(17) Oxytocin—use in postparturition therapeutic applications.

(18) Parasiticides—Prohibited in slaughter stock, allowed in emergency treatment for dairy and breeder stock when organic system plan-approved preventive management does not prevent infestation. Milk or milk products from a treated animal cannot be labeled as provided for in subpart D of this part for 90 days following treatment. In breeder stock, treatment cannot occur during the last third of gestation if the progeny will be sold as organic and must not be used during the lactation period for breeding stock.

(i) Fenbendazole (CAS #43210-67-9)—only for use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian.

(ii) Ivermectin (CAS #70288-86-7).

(iii) Moxidectin (CAS #113507-06-5)—for control of internal parasites only.

(19) Peroxyacetic/peracetic acid (CAS #-79-21-0)—for sanitizing facility and processing equipment.

(20) Phosphoric acid—allowed as an equipment cleaner, Provided, That, no direct contact with organically managed livestock or land occurs.

(21) Poloxalene (CAS #-9003-11-6)—for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires that poloxalene only be used for the emergency treatment of bloat.

(22) Tolazoline (CAS #-59-98-3)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian;

(ii) Use only to reverse the effects of sedation and analgesia caused by Xylazine; and

(iii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 8 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 4 days after administering to dairy animals.

(23) Xylazine (CAS #-7361-61-7)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian;

(ii) The existence of an emergency; and

(iii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 8 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 4 days after administering to dairy animals.

(b) As topical treatment, external parasiticide or local anesthetic as applicable.

(1) Copper sulfate.

(2) Formic acid (CAS # 64-18-6)—for use as a pesticide solely within honeybee hives.

(3) Iodine.

(4) Lidocaine—as a local anesthetic. Use requires a withdrawal period of 90 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter and 7 days after administering to dairy animals.

(5) Lime, hydrated—as an external pest control, not permitted to cauterize physical alterations or deodorize animal wastes.

(6) Mineral oil—for topical use and as a lubricant.

(7) Procaine—as a local anesthetic, use requires a withdrawal period of 90 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter and 7 days after administering to dairy animals.

(8) Sucrose octanoate esters (CAS #s-42922-74-7; 58064-47-4)—in accordance with approved labeling.

(c) As feed supplements—None.

(d) As feed additives.

(1) DL-Methionine, DL-Methionine-hydroxy analog, and DL-Methionine-hydroxy analog calcium (CAS #'s 59-51-8, 583-91-5, 4857-44-7, and 922-50-9)—for use only in organic poultry production at the following maximum levels of synthetic methionine per ton of feed: Laying and broiler chickens—2 pounds; turkeys and all other poultry—3 pounds.

(2) Trace minerals, used for enrichment or fortification when FDA approved.

(3) Vitamins, used for enrichment or fortification when FDA approved.

(e) As synthetic inert ingredients as classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for use with nonsynthetic substances or synthetic substances listed in this section and used as an active pesticide ingredient in accordance with any limitations on the use of such substances.

(1) EPA List 4—Inerts of Minimal Concern.

(2) [Reserved]

(f) Excipients, only for use in the manufacture of drugs used to treat organic livestock when the excipient is: Identified by the FDA as Generally Recognized As Safe; Approved by the FDA as a food additive; or Included in the FDA review and approval of a New Animal Drug Application or New Drug Application.

(g)-(z) [Reserved]

[72 FR 70484, Dec. 12, 2007, as amended at 73 FR 54059, Sept. 18, 2008; 75 FR 51924, Aug. 24, 2010; 77 FR 28745, May 15, 2012; 77 FR 45907, Aug. 2, 2012; 77 FR 57989, Sept. 19, 2012]

§205.604   Nonsynthetic substances prohibited for use in organic livestock production.

The following nonsynthetic substances may not be used in organic livestock production:

(a) Strychnine.

(b)-(z) [Reserved]

§205.605   Nonagricultural (nonorganic) substances allowed as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as "organic" or "made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s))."

The following nonagricultural substances may be used as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as "organic" or "made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s))" only in accordance with any restrictions specified in this section.

(a) Nonsynthetics allowed:

Acids (Alginic; Citric—produced by microbial fermentation of carbohydrate substances; and Lactic).

Agar-agar.

Animal enzymes—(Rennet—animals derived; Catalase—bovine liver; Animal lipase; Pancreatin; Pepsin; and Trypsin).

Attapulgite—as a processing aid in the handling of plant and animal oils.

Bentonite.

Calcium carbonate.

Calcium chloride.

Calcium sulfate—mined.

Carrageenan.

Dairy cultures.

Diatomaceous earth—food filtering aid only.

Egg white lysozyme (CAS # 9001-63-2)

Enzymes—must be derived from edible, nontoxic plants, nonpathogenic fungi, or nonpathogenic bacteria.

Flavors, nonsynthetic sources only and must not be produced using synthetic solvents and carrier systems or any artificial preservative.

Gellan gum (CAS # 71010-52-1)—high-acyl form only.

Glucono delta-lactone—production by the oxidation of D-glucose with bromine water is prohibited.

Kaolin.

L-Malic acid (CAS # 97-67-6).

Magnesium sulfate, nonsynthetic sources only.

Microorganisms—any food grade bacteria, fungi, and other microorganism.

Nitrogen—oil-free grades.

Oxygen—oil-free grades.

Perlite—for use only as a filter aid in food processing.

Potassium chloride.

Potassium iodide.

Sodium bicarbonate.

Sodium carbonate.

Tartaric acid—made from grape wine.

Waxes—nonsynthetic (Carnauba wax; and Wood resin).

Yeast—When used as food or a fermentation agent in products labeled as "organic," yeast must be organic if its end use is for human consumption; nonorganic yeast may be used when organic yeast is not commercially available. Growth on petrochemical substrate and sulfite waste liquor is prohibited. For smoked yeast, nonsynthetic smoke flavoring process must be documented.

(b) Synthetics allowed:

Acidified sodium chlorite—Secondary direct antimicrobial food treatment and indirect food contact surface sanitizing. Acidified with citric acid only.

Activated charcoal (CAS #s 7440-44-0; 64365-11-3)—only from vegetative sources; for use only as a filtering aid.

Alginates.

Ammonium bicarbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

Ammonium carbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

Ascorbic acid.

Calcium citrate.

Calcium hydroxide.

Calcium phosphates (monobasic, dibasic, and tribasic).

Carbon dioxide.

Cellulose—for use in regenerative casings, as an anti-caking agent (non-chlorine bleached) and filtering aid.

Chlorine materials—disinfecting and sanitizing food contact surfaces, Except, That, residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act (Calcium hypochlorite; Chlorine dioxide; and Sodium hypochlorite).

Cyclohexylamine (CAS # 108-91-8)—for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization.

Diethylaminoethanol (CAS # 100-37-8)—for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization.

Ethylene—allowed for postharvest ripening of tropical fruit and degreening of citrus.

Ferrous sulfate—for iron enrichment or fortification of foods when required by regulation or recommended (independent organization).

Glycerides (mono and di)—for use only in drum drying of food.

Glycerin—produced by hydrolysis of fats and oils.

Hydrogen peroxide.

Magnesium carbonate—for use only in agricultural products labeled "made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s))," prohibited in agricultural products labeled "organic".

Magnesium chloride—derived from sea water.

Magnesium stearate—for use only in agricultural products labeled "made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s))," prohibited in agricultural products labeled "organic".

Nutrient vitamins and minerals, in accordance with 21 CFR 104.20, Nutritional Quality Guidelines For Foods.

Octadecylamine (CAS # 124-30-1)—for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization.

Ozone.

Peracetic acid/Peroxyacetic acid (CAS # 79-21-0)—for use in wash and/or rinse water according to FDA limitations. For use as a sanitizer on food contact surfaces.

Phosphoric acid—cleaning of food-contact surfaces and equipment only.

Potassium acid tartrate.

Potassium carbonate.

Potassium citrate.

Potassium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables except when used for peeling peaches.

Potassium phosphate—for use only in agricultural products labeled "made with organic (specific ingredients or food group(s))," prohibited in agricultural products labeled "organic".

Silicon dioxide—Permitted as a defoamer. Allowed for other uses when organic rice hulls are not commercially available.

Sodium acid pyrophosphate (CAS # 7758-16-9)—for use only as a leavening agent.

Sodium citrate.

Sodium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables.

Sodium phosphates—for use only in dairy foods.

Sulfur dioxide—for use only in wine labeled "made with organic grapes," Provided, That, total sulfite concentration does not exceed 100 ppm.

Tetrasodium pyrophosphate (CAS # 7722-88-5)—for use only in meat analog products.

Tocopherols—derived from vegetable oil when rosemary extracts are not a suitable alternative.

Xanthan gum.

(c)-(z) [Reserved]

[68 FR 61993, Oct. 31, 2003, as amended as 68 FR 62217, Nov. 3, 2003; 71 FR 53302, Sept. 11, 2006; 72 FR 58473, Oct. 16, 2007; 73 FR 59481, Oct. 9, 2008; 75 FR 77524, Dec. 13, 2010; 77 FR 8092, Feb. 14, 2012; 77 FR 33298, June 6, 2012; 77 FR 45907, Aug. 2, 2012; 78 FR 31821, May 28, 2013; 78 FR 61161, Oct. 3, 2013]

§205.606   Nonorganically produced agricultural products allowed as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as "organic."

Only the following nonorganically produced agricultural products may be used as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as "organic," only in accordance with any restrictions specified in this section, and only when the product is not commercially available in organic form.

(a) Casings, from processed intestines.

(b) Celery powder.

(c) Chia (Salvia hispanica L.).

(d) Colors derived from agricultural products—Must not be produced using synthetic solvents and carrier systems or any artificial preservative.

(1) Beet juice extract color (pigment CAS #7659-95-2).

(2) Beta-carotene extract color—derived from carrots or algae (pigment CAS# 7235-40-7).

(3) Black currant juice color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(4) Black/Purple carrot juice color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(5) Blueberry juice color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(6) Carrot juice color (pigment CAS #1393-63-1).

(7) Cherry juice color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(8) Chokeberry—Aronia juice color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(9) Elderberry juice color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(10) Grape juice color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(11) Grape skin extract color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(12) Paprika color (CAS #68917-78-2)—dried, and oil extracted.

(13) Pumpkin juice color (pigment CAS #127-40-2).

(14) Purple potato juice (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(15) Red cabbage extract color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(16) Red radish extract color (pigment CAS #'s: 528-58-5, 528-53-0, 643-84-5, 134-01-0, 1429-30-7, and 134-04-3).

(17) Saffron extract color (pigment CAS #1393-63-1).

(18) Turmeric extract color (CAS #458-37-7).

(e) Dillweed oil (CAS # 8006-75-5).

(f) Fish oil (Fatty acid CAS #'s: 10417-94-4, and 25167-62-8)—stabilized with organic ingredients or only with ingredients on the National List, §§205.605 and 205.606.

(g) Fortified cooking wines.

(1) Marsala.

(2) Sherry.

(h) Fructooligosaccharides (CAS # 308066-66-2).

(i) Galangal, frozen.

(j) Gelatin (CAS # 9000-70-8).

(k) Gums—water extracted only (Arabic; Guar; Locust bean; and Carob bean).

(l) Inulin-oligofructose enriched (CAS # 9005-80-5).

(m) Kelp—for use only as a thickener and dietary supplement.

(n) Konjac flour (CAS # 37220-17-0).

(o) Lecithin—de-oiled.

(p) Lemongrass—frozen.

(q) Orange pulp, dried.

(r) Orange shellac-unbleached (CAS # 9000-59-3).

(s) Pectin (non-amidated forms only).

(t) Peppers (Chipotle chile).

(u) Seaweed, Pacific kombu.

(v) Starches.

(1) Cornstarch (native).

(2) Sweet potato starch—for bean thread production only.

(w) Tragacanth gum (CAS #-9000-65-1).

(x) Turkish bay leaves.

(y) Wakame seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida).

(z) Whey protein concentrate.

[72 FR 35140, June 27, 2007, as amended at 75 FR 77524, Dec. 13, 2010; 77 FR 8092, Feb. 14, 2012; 77 FR 33299, June 6, 2012; 77 FR 44429, July 30, 2012; 78 FR 31821, May 28, 2013; 79 FR 58663, Sept. 30, 2014]

Friday, December 05, 2014

Happening in Mohall right now. Great group great people.

Jamie Oliver are you clueless or simply have an agenda?

Jamie Oliver stupidity on display again: "We don't have hormones in our meat; that's banned. But not over there. We don't have hundreds of poisons and pesticides that have been proven to be carcinogenic. They do." WAIT Mr Oliver I was in Ireland and saw 5000 BULLS on feed for the French market...best check on the hormone level in bull meat compared to steers with implants.... By the way neither one are a fraction of what your leafy greens are.

Hormones all around us


THERE is increasing concern, it seems, about the hormones in our meat and milk, but what about the hormones associated with kissing? Have we fully considered that risk?


The science is now there.


Researchers from Lafayette College in Pennsylvania have found that locking lips actually sparks an increase of hormones to the brain. Through a series of complex chemical processes, those involved in kissing were found to experience a combination of relaxation and excitement.

So, if, as some claim, hormones are not good for us in any way, shape or form, then perhaps for our own safety, kissing must not be allowed to happen.


Not surprisingly, most of the conversations I regularly get involved in as I travel around the country are about hormones in food. People think they want hormone-free everything, yet let us not forget that anything hormone free is not alive.


Misinformation and misunderstanding of the value of hormones to our everyday life have perpetuated the concern over hormones. Some of that has certainly been the result of activists and those attempting to remove technology and efficiency from the food production system. However, some also has been the result of misleading messages from a few in our own industry.


I recently received a note from a rancher in central Montana who was critical of me for publicly presenting the difference between natural and conventional beef. His point was that grass-fed, organic or natural beef are better because they don't have hormones.


The fact of the matter, though, is that a three-ounce serving of beef from an animal that has never been given estrogen-based hormones contains 1.39 nanograms (ng) of estrogen compared with 1.89 ng of estrogen in the same amount of conventionally produced beef from steers that have had two doses of estrogen-based hormones. The differences are basically insignificant.


The greater point for me is that hormone levels in beef and milk are actually considerably lower than some plant-based food sources, yet consumers don't seem at all concerned about that. Take, for example, a tablespoon of soybean oil, which contains 28,000 ng of estrogen. Four ounces of raw cabbage has 2,700 ng of estrogen, and four ounces of raw peas have 454 ng of estrogen.

 

So, I ask, how can we in animal agriculture continue to complain about the "misinformed" consumer when far too often, people within our own industry are guilty of supplying bad information? I would hope it is a matter of them simply being misinformed and that they are not knowingly putting the entire industry at risk for their personal financial gain.


While it is human nature to want to avoid chemicals and hormones and things we don't truly understand, it is also not wise to do so without the factual knowledge that there is any associated risk.


The researchers from Lafayette College have shown us yet another way hormones regularly improve our lives. That is straight from my lips to yours. Now, take it from your lips to consumers you encounter along the way each day.


Estrogen comparisons


It is important to recognize that many common foods naturally contain estrogen (or phytoestrogen in plants) at levels hundreds or thousands of times higher than the levels in dairy or beef products that come from animals given estrogen hormones.

In addition, estrogen levels in dairy and beef products from hormone-treated animals are essentially the same as products from untreated animals.

The following are some such comparisons:

* 4 ounces of beef from steer given hormones: 1.6 ng of estrogen

* 4 ounces of beef from untreated steer: 1.2 ng of estrogen

* 4 ounces of beef from non-pregnant heifer: 1.5 ng of estrogen

* 4 ounces of raw cabbage: 2,700 ng of estrogen

* 4 ounces of raw peas: 454 ng of estrogen

* 3 ounces of soybean oil: 168,000 ng of estrogen

* 3.5 ounces of soy protein concentrate: 102,000 ng of estrogen

* 3 ounces of milk from cow given recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST): 11 ng of estrogen

* 3 ounces of milk from non-rbST-treated cow: 11 ng of estrogen

* Average level in a woman of childbearing age: 480,000 ng of estrogen 

Thursday, November 06, 2014

I join with Nina to request your signature on letter to USDA and HHS

Dear Friends,

I am passing along a letter that I think you might consider signing. It is written by a reputable advocacy group called the Healthy Nation Coalition led by dietitians who seek to challenge the current trajectory of the USDA 2015 Dietary Guidelines.

The committee in charge of reviewing the science for the USDA is finishing up its work over the next two months, and these experts appear poised to promote more of the same nutritional advice that has proven ineffective for more than 35 years (For more, see an oped I wrote that appeared in the Wall Street Journal last week; also see the vivid graph below).

Often, people ask me what they can do to change the official nutrition advice in our country, and I'd say this is a great place to start.

For my part, as an independent journalist, I'm simply interested in seeing a nutrition policy based on the best scientific knowledge. Currently, the USDA committee is ignoring a large body of rigorous science that could help correct past errors. 


The Healthy Nation Coalition aims to build a broad-based coalition that includes scientists, health care practitioners, ranchers & farmers, health advocacy groups, etc.  

This letter will be sent to the Secretaries of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services, selected policymakers, and media outlets. The hope is to add to the momentum that has been building in the national media and among lobbyists in D.C. to call for reform of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines. 

The letter is attached and also pasted below. If you wish to sign on, please use this quick form to add your information to the letter.

Please feel free to forward this letter to colleagues of yours whom you feel might be interested in this issue.

My best,

Nina Teicholz
Author, The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet (Simon & Schuster 2014)
www.thebigfatsurprise.com

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Case history on government intervention in antibiotic usage in food animals from Animal Health Institute

The Antibiotic Ban in Denmark: A Case Study on Politically Driven Bans

In the 1990s, the European Union made a political decision to phase out the use of antibiotics as growth promoters (AGPs). Denmark – with a pork industry roughly equivalent to the size of the pork herd in Iowa – led the way by instituting a full voluntary ban in 1998, and making it compulsory in 2000.

As there have been proposals in the U.S. Congress that would ban even more uses of antibiotics in animal agriculture, the Danish experience provides an interesting and instructive case study. The results have illustrated how counterproductive a sweeping ban can be, including several clear consequences, including:

  • Increased death and disease among animals;
  • Greater amounts of antibiotics used to treat animal disease, although overall use has decreased — total use declined by 26 percent between 1998 and 2009, while quantities used for therapeutic purposes increased 223 percent;
  • While resistance to some antibiotics has decreased in animals, resistance to other antibiotics has gone up;
  • Little evidence exists to suggest that antibiotic resistance in humans has declined, which was the purpose of the ban.

Bottom line: A ban on AGPs in Denmark has not had the intended benefit of reducing antibiotic resistance patterns in humans; it has had the unintended consequence of increasing animal suffering, pain and death.

Link to whole story


Friday, October 03, 2014

We have been getting bad nutritional advice for 50 years now The Big Fat Surprise with Nina Teicholz


​Nina Teicholz has never received any industry funding of any kind on the business of improving the health and wellbeing of consumers. She simply spent 9 years investigating why we get the nutritional advice we do and determined it has been politics as much as nutrition. Her book the The Big Fat Surprise is the result.
www.thebigfatsurprise.com


Link here to listen to the show

Request "Hormones In" your food


​Campaign starts today. Any establishment that promotes "hormone free" walk in and ask "Can I get hormones in my food?" When they say no respond "I only eat foods with hormones tell your boss". THEN LEAVE.... report back your experience and we will compile all the stories and I will give prizes to creative people. HORMONES IN starts now.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Loos Tales for Sept 25, 2014 Farm Aid teams up with BOLD Nebraska comes to fleece Nebraskan's this weekend


​Today on Loos Tales Trent will shed light on why the consumer needs the Keystone XL pipeline. Incorrectly people believe this is all about oil but not building the pipeline hurts farmers bad. Farm Aid a bunch who lies about helping farmers is part the problem not solution.